Dame Fortune talks about a writing project

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I already did this reading almost a week ago but forgot to post it here. Thank you, Daisy, for granting me the permission to do so!

This was Daisy’s question:

I’d love [the spread] ‘A Different Perspective’ on my writing project…

1 – 2 – 3

1. An issue that’s not going so smoothly right nowThree of Batons
Your writing project seems to be stuck at a point where you have to make a decision about how to proceed. Several options are possible, all seem equally promising to you, but you can only take one. The scale of your perspective is off, you’re either zoomed in too much, getting lost in all the minor details, or zoomed out too much, not being able to make out any path at all.

2. How can you change your perspective on this issue to make it less of a challenge?Ten of Cups
You need to set up some boundaries about what to include and what to leave out. You may be able to put some “aside” stuff into the footnotes or into a small subplot or something, but you need to decide what the central focus of your writing project is. Then it will become much clearer what parts belong to it and which ones don’t. You can always save the cut material for later, for another project, if you can’t bear seeing it go to waste. But this project has clear limits and it’s up to you to define/declare them, and then stick to them. I believe this will release the flow that is blocked right now. It will also provide you with the right scale to look at the project, far away enough to see it as a whole, but still close enough to make out relevant details.

3. The result of making that changeThe Devil
What a strange card to follow the two previous ones! For some reason, I’m thinking of Frankenstein’s monster here, a somewhat mismatched, clumsy, and slightly sad creature that wants to be useful and appreciated. It’s not threatening at all, just unfamiliar. I’m also reminded of Picasso’s cubist portraits, and of fantastical creatures with body parts of several species. It makes you pause and wonder, tilt your head and look again, wonder some more… I get the impression that your creation is not necessarily a tidy one that follows established rules. (I imagine it can be hard to decide what belongs and what doesn’t when you’re making something that hasn’t been made before.) You’re doing something different (experimental?) here, something that may elicit just this reaction from people. It may be misunderstood at first, maybe even underappreciated, but it’s actually rather fascinating and powerful. But no matter what other people think of your writing, you will be able to create something you believe in, and that’s what counts.

I admit the last card threw me a bit at first. It’s so different than the other two in terms of color, drawing style, proportions, and use of space, and yet it obviously is a card from the same deck. I see this as reworking the form (or content?) of your writing, breaking with certain conventions but still retaining enough points of connection to make it “count” as whatever it is you’re writing (e.g. it’s still a novel, a thesis, a poem, a song…).

Out of curiousity (the deck uses the Etteilla keywords, not the Golden Dawn ones), I also looked up the cards in the LWB:
Three of Batons: Enterprise. To undertake something, to commence. Audacity, boldness, imprudence.
Ten of Cups: Homeland. The consultant’s town, city, place of origin.
The Devil: Power. Major force. Avoidable evil.

Here’s my summary of them, as a sort of sideline quasi-bibliomancy reading:
You’ve started your writing project enthusiastically, any maybe took on a little more than you could chew. If you change your perspective to one that is “closer to home,” and maybe a little less extravagant/huge, you’ll release the full power of your writing force.

(In my mind, the two readings don’t contradict each other but work well as two sides of the same coin.)

I hope the reading is useful to you! I’m very curious about your feedback, too. :)

I picked out one sentence from Daisy’s feedback that didn’t have too many details, to give you an idea of her take on my reading:

Interesting reading, with really useful advice – thank you! The identified problem and ways of proceeding were spot on; here’s hoping I can pull together this Frankenstein’s monster and make it work!

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2 responses »

  1. That’s a great spread and a wonderful reading, Cat. I’ll have to do that for my two writing projects. I love 3-card spreads as they are not too complicated and don’t lose themselves in details. And when it’s practical advice about a project you don’t want endless philosophical answers. ;)

    Thanks for showing us this.

  2. I’m glad you found the spread useful! I didn’t give credit for it, but I couldn’t find the original source (it was a suggested spread in one of the “Deck of the Week” reading exchanges on Aeclectic).

    I also like three-carders best and rarely go over seven cards in any spread. Some of the three-card readings still get quite wordy, and if they didn’t, there just wasn’t anything else to say. I can’t even imagine doing a spread with twenty cards or even the whole deck – I’d spend the entire day typing up everything and would probably get horribly confused by all the connections and interplay between the cards!

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